Woman loses Tim Hortons prize online

8

ST. JOHN’S, N.L. – A woman who posted a photo of her prize-winning Tim Hortons cup on Facebook is speaking out after someone spotted the security number on the rim and claimed the $100 prize ahead of her.

Margaret Coward of Conception Bay South, N.L., says she didn’t know the Roll-Up-the Rim gift card award could be claimed online.

And she says she can’t believe one of her 900 Facebook friends would do that to her.

She says it all happened in the span of a half hour.

Soon after she posted the photo, she called the local Tim’s outlet to get a winner’s form — but she was told it would be easier to claim the prize online.

But when she tried to register, she learned the prize was already gone, and a company official later told her the email address of the person who claimed the prize couldn’t be revealed for privacy reasons. (St. John’s Telegram)

8 COMMENTS

  1. Unfortunately, this woman is under the I oression, as many Facebook users are, that only their “Friends” can see their posts. Often, others beyond that circle can see posts because of the privacy settings of the “Friends” — people who are Friends of Friends, etc. Always assume you have NO privacy on social media sites.

  2. That’s unfortunate for her and in a perfect world she should not have been a victim but naivety can be no excuse . Sadly people divulge more than they realize on the Internet. Take for example all those fun games people pass around on Facebook that trick you into publicizing personal information: Name the street you grew up on….Match the last four numbers of you cell phone to this chart to get your faerie name….Find your birth month and day on this chart for your warrior name and the list goes on and on. Hackers and dishonest or selfish people can, and will use this information to their advantage. The information you divulge is a great start for someone wishing to social engineer access to more information about you for identity theft or by accessing your e-mail or online profiles using the answers you provided to your Password Recovery questions in the above games.

  3. That’s unfortunate for her and in a perfect world she should not have been a victim but naivety can be no excuse . Sadly people divulge more than they realize on the Internet. Take for example all those fun games people pass around on Facebook that trick you into publicizing personal information: Name the street you grew up on….Match the last four numbers of you cell phone to this chart to get your faerie name….Find your birth month and day on this chart for your warrior name and the list goes on and on. Hackers and dishonest or selfish people can, and will use this information to their advantage. The information you divulge is a great start for someone wishing to social engineer access to more information about you for identity theft or by accessing your e-mail or online profiles using the answers you provided to your Password Recovery questions in the above games.

Comments are closed.