For your viewing pleasure. Maple Sap Dripping

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A unique Canadian beverage company near Flesherton, Ontario is taking ‘live web cam’ right into the maple tree stands and woods in a region of Ontario where maple sap is presently awakening and pulsating within maple trees. Flesherton is located in the Municipality of Grey Highlands, in Grey County, Ontario, Canada.

20150402_105133According to the website, ‘Lower Valley Beverage Company’, ‘Sapsucker is water harvested from mature maple trees, technically called sap. The early spring harvest season is only a few weeks long, and depends on just the right weather—cold enough for the trees to still have stores of energy for winter in their roots, but warm enough during the day for the sap to flow. Sapsucker is produced as a by-product of the natural growth process of maple trees, not by drilling into underground aquifers. The water each tree gives us originates as rain and ambient moisture in the air and soil. A maple tree can produce sap from maturity to 100 years of age or more without ever disrupting underground water resources (and, as a bonus, it naturally absorbs CO2 the whole time)

20150402_105333When the time is right, we harvest it using an age-old process that does no harm to our trees, and lets them continue to produce throughout their natural lives. The taste of maple sap is one of the best-kept secrets of country life. Generations of rural kids fondly remember drinking it straight out of the bucket during the harvest, and no wonder. It’s delicious.
A glass of Sapsucker looks and drinks just like a glass of water, which it essentially is. However, its source gives it a couple of special qualities. One is its soft roundness on the palate. Sapsucker doesn’t have the strong minerality of some bottled waters, which we think gives them too much edge to enjoy with food. And the other is its hint of sweetness. More of a sensation than a flavour, it gives Sapsucker a refreshing quality without any lingering aftertaste.’

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Maple Syrup harvested from our own Algoma District including St. Joseph’s Island, is still the best in the entire world. No contest. To read a story about The Crowder Maple Sugar Bush on St. Joe’s Island Go Here.

To watch the live ‘sapsucker’ webcam, go to:
http://www.sapsucker.ca/sapcam/