Headlines this morning

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morning news break

wynne-climate-changeONTARIO PREMIER VISITS THE SAULT

Ontario Premier, Kathleen Wynne will visit the Sault Monday, to tour a school and then make an announcement at 2:45pm. The public is invited to a meet and greet with Wynne and David Orazietti at a BBQ being staged at Bellevue Park from 4:30 pm to 7:30pm

 

defence policy reviewCANADIAN DELEGATION BOUND FOR AFRICA ON FACT FINDING MISSION

Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan is heading to Africa today as the Trudeau government mulls over a Canadian peacekeeping mission on the continent. Sajjan will be accompanied by Louise Arbour, former UN high commissioner for human rights, and retired general Romeo Dallaire, who commanded the peacekeeping mission during the Rwandan genocide. Their fact finding mission will take them to the Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda.

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GREEN PARTY ATTACKED OVER ANTI-ISRAEL POLICY

The Green party is facing fire from Canadian Jewish groups. Delegates at the Green’s weekend convention voted in favour of a resolution supporting boycotts and sanctions against Israel over the way it has dealt with the Palestinians. B’nai Brith and the Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs both condemned the decision to back the so-called Boycott Divestment and Sanctions movement. Critics say the BDS campaign is aimed at delegitimizing Israel itself, while supporters say it’s aimed at supporting Palestinian independence.

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SUPREME-COURTJUSTICE MINISTER HIRES CRITIC OF SUPREME COURT RULING ON ASSISTED DYING

Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould is facing criticism over her choice of Gregoire Webber as her new legal affairs adviser. The highly touted legal scholar once argued that the Supreme Court erred when it struck down the ban on medically assisted dying. Supporters of the High Court ruling say the Webber hire raises another flag about how Wilson-Raybould is handling the difficult issue of Canadians seeking an end to intolerable suffering.

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VICTORIA’S TENT CITY ORDERED TO DISMANTLE TODAY

A B.C. Supreme Court judge has ruled Victoria’s tent city, which has expanded to support dozens of informal shelters since it began with just a few tents last year, must be dismantled today due to deteriorating health and safety conditions. The hodge-podge of tents and tarps on the lawn just outside the court house in B.C.’s capital has focused national attention on the plight of homeless Canadians.

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SASKATCHEWAN WILL NAME NEW DEPUTY PREMIER

A new deputy premier of Saskatchewan will be named today, in the wake of impaired driving charges filed against a key member of Premier Brad Wall’s government. Don McMorris announced his resignation Saturday, saying he is leaving the governing Saskatchewan Party caucus until the allegations are dealt with by the courts. McMorris oversaw the province’s liquor and gaming authority and other Crown agencies.

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NATIONAL ENERGY BOARD HEARINGS INTO ENERGY EAST SET TO BEGIN

The National Energy Board is set to begin public hearings today into the Energy East Pipeline in New Brunswick, a province where the prospect of oil and gas development has led to fierce, and sometimes violent, protest in the past. A three-member panel tasked with deciding the fate of the controversial $15.7-billion development will start the hearings in Saint John, where the oil that would be shipped through the proposed 4,500-kilometre project would be refined.

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gretzky statueGRETZKY STATUE GETS A FACELIFT

He’s 9 foot 2 and bulletproof, and still looks great. But at age 27 the statue of hockey legend Wayne Gretzky is in need of a good scrubbing and a new coat of wax. The 950 pound bronze statue of “The Great One” has been on display at Edmonton’s coliseum for nearly three decades. And now with a move to a new arena coming in the near future he’s getting some spit and polish treatment at the shop where he was created in Cochrane, just west of Calgary.

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HIGH-TECH TOOLS REWRITE THE BIRD BOOKS

A new generation of high-technology — from isotope analysis to satellite imagery to geo-locators — is helping scientists gain a deeper understanding of the lives of birds. And researchers say the new things they’re learning are helping them develop much improved conservation models.

1 COMMENT

  1. A meet and greet with Wynne and David Orazietti?
    No, thanks.
    The next news I want to hear about them is that they are no longer in power.
    The next election can’t come fast enough.

Comments are closed.