Your morning news brief

0
morning news break

canada postCANADA POST, CUPW STILL TALKING

The threat of possible job action by Canada Post workers is on hold for at least 24 hours. The Canadian Union of Postal Workers had served notice it members would begin a rotating ban on overtime today if an agreement wasn’t reached. But the union says it’s holding off on that for 24 hours to give federally mediated contract talks a last chance to succeed. The Crown corporation says it agreed to the mediator’s request to extend the talks for another day, however, there’s no indication whether the two sides have been able to resolve key issues.

———

trudeauTRUDEAU LEAVES FOR CHINA

Strengthening economic ties between Canada and China is the prime minister’s top priority as Justin Trudeau flies to China today. Trudeau has a busy nine day trip ahead with stops in four major Chinese cities plus taking part in the G20 leader’s summit. Trudeau has indicated he’ll raise human rights issues with the Chinese leadership. China’s ambassador to Canada was sounding a conciliatory tone in advance of the visit, acknowledging his country has more work to do in the area of human rights.

———

trudeauTRUDEAU DOESN’T FOLLOW HARPER’S LEAD ON ARCTIC VISITS

Stephen Harper used to make annual visits to Canada’s Arctic but it doesn’t appear his successor is going to follow his lead. Justin Trudeau is heading to China today and his office says he has no plans to attend an annual military exercise that used to coincide with Harper’s annual Arctic trips. Some northern experts say having a prime minister regularly visit the region sent a signal to other countries and drew government attention to the region.

———

OTTAWAFEDS WILLING TO CONSIDER FOREIGN WORKERS FOR LGN

Federal documents say officials advised Labour Minister MaryAnn Mihychuk to send a positive signal that liquefied natural gas companies could use temporary foreign workers. The documents obtained by The Canadian Press indicate officials recommended that Mihychuk make it clear that it should be a last resort if the companies couldn’t find enough Canadians for the jobs. The documents also show that federal officials realized it was inevitable companies would need temporary foreign workers to proceed with the energy projects in western Canada.

———

fentanylPOLICE WARN ONTARIO COULD SOON FACE FENTANYL CRISIS

Ontario police and community groups are sounding the alarm that a fentanyl crisis may be looming as synthetic versions of the drug appear across the province. An advisory from the Ontario Association of Chiefs of Police and other groups says 2016 has been a record year for overdose alerts and seizures of “bootleg” fentanyls. B.C.’s chief medical officer declared a state of emergency earlier this year following an increase in drug overdose deaths, many of which were linked to the dangerous opioid.