Headlines this morning

0
morning news break

emmy awardsCANADA’S TATIANA MASLANY HONOURED WITH EMMY

She’s known as one of the hardest working women in TV, and last night Tatiana Maslany was rewarded for her hard work, and talent, winning the Emmy for best lead actress in a drama for her multiple roles in “Orphan Black.” The Regina native, who plays several clones with different personalities and accents in the sci-fi series, was handed the coveted trophy in Los Angeles by fellow Canadian actor Kiefer Sutherland.

———

new yorkJUSTIN TRUDEAU IN BIG APPLE ON UN BUSINESS

The refugee crisis will top Justin Trudeau’s agenda in New York as the prime minister discusses the issue with fellow world leaders at the United Nations. He’ll co-chair a roundtable session on refugees today. And tomorrow he’ll co-host a leaders’ summit on the crisis, along with U.S. President Barack Obama and the leaders of Germany, Sweden, Mexico, Ethiopia and Jordan. Trudeau will also deliver his maiden speech to the U.N. General Assembly on Tuesday.

———

court-gavelSENTENCING FOR WOMAN CONVICTED OF STEPDAUGHTER’S MURDER

Formal sentencing is scheduled today in Toronto for a woman convicted of second-degree murder in the brutal death of her stepdaughter. Elaine Biddersingh was convicted in June in the death of 17-year-old Melonie Biddersingh, whose body was found in a burning suitcase in 1994. It took until 2011 to finally identify her remains. Everton Biddersingh was found guilty in January of first-degree murder in his daughter’s death.

———

Canadian AirforceOMBUDSMAN WANTS MILITARY TO CUT RED TAPE FOR INJURED SOLDIERS:

The military’s ombudsman says a simpler transition system would benefit members of the Canadian Forces whose careers are ended by injury or illness. Gary Welbourne says a medical release from the military is a very complicated business, and the burden has taken its toll on members moving into civilian life. He suggests it’s now time to streamline the process.

———

british ex patsLIVING IN CANADA HITS BRITISH EXPATS IN THE POCKETBOOK:

Some 150,000 British retires say they’re being short changed by the British government because they live in Canada. They don’t get annual increases in their United Kingdom pension cheques because they reside in Canada. Successive British governments have refused to index their pensions to keep pace with the cost of living, despite decades of diplomatic overtures from Canadian officials. But they hope BREXIT will change that because British nationals who live in other European Union countries do get annual pension increases.