Talks needed on decriminalizing hard drugs to address opioid crisis, Tam says

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OTTAWA — Canada’s chief health officer says Canadians should be “seized” with the crisis of rising deaths from opioid use, and she suggests decriminalizing hard drugs should be part of the discussion to find solutions.

Dr. Theresa Tam says several provinces — including British Columbia, Ontario and Alberta — are seeing concerning spikes in overdose deaths since the COVID-19 pandemic began.

During a news conference Friday, she said the situation is “escalating as we speak.”

Tam says increasing access to a safer supply of drugs and building more supervised consumption sites are among the critical steps needed to reduce opioid deaths.

But she also says all approaches must be considered, including “moving toward a societal discussion on decriminalization.”

Several officials and groups have called on the federal government to decriminalize hard drugs to address this opioid crisis, including the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police and B.C’s premier and provincial health officer.

Tam said Friday that jurisdictions cannot arrest their way out of this problem, and applauded a recent directive by the independent public prosecution office instructing federal prosecutors to only go after the most serious drug possession offences that raise public safety concerns.

Health Minister Patty Hajdu has said there is no silver bullet to solve the opioid crisis and that a suite of tools is needed to fully tackle the problem — but she has heard the calls for decriminalization and it’s something government is deliberating.

35 COMMENTS

  1. And after we legalize these drugs our border with the United States will become hardened! The flow of goods will cease and Canada will fall into a permanent economic depression.

  2. Its natural to read that and think wtf. But please folks look into other countries that have legalized it. I promise it’s not what it sounds like. Feel free to dm me and I can send you some resources and videos better explaining what’s going on with this decision

  3. Perhaps focusing on putting more money to the cause of addictions.. trauma, mental health and having readily available treatment options? People want to get sober and are told.. great! We will put you on the wait list!

  4. There are no hard and fast ways to put an end to this because at the end of the day people will have free will
    Money spent on education and social programs that bring people together and give them solid ground to grow from will lead away from these life style choices- not all the time but will increase the chances
    Allowing drugs to not be criminalized is just not the answer

  5. Decriminalization isn’t to benefit the dealer it’s for the user and I think it would be a good strategy if detox becomes part of the process. Drug addiction is an epidemic in itself.

  6. No they need harsher penalties for possession and attempted manslaughter charges for all dealers. And the government really needs to stop enabling junkies by handing out needles.

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